Running VRUI and Linux on USB thumb drive

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Oliver Kreylos 1 month ago.

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  • #103734

    localmicro
    Participant

    Has anyone ever successfully managed to get VRUI onto a USB 3.0 stick and running? I have Linux Mint on a bootable USB stick and have been trying for about a month to get VRUI on there too. Every time I solve one problem, there’s another.

    You wouldn’t think this was so difficult. Has anyone ever done it?

    #103736

    Oliver Kreylos
    Moderator

    No, but it’s something we want to do. Step one is to create binary packages for Vrui, Kinect, and SARndbox. I’ve done that for Fedora Linux (and other rpm-based distros), but not for Ubuntu. Step 2 is to assemble a minimal base system plus graphics card drivers and the SARndbox-related packages into a live image. I’ve looked into doing that via a Fedora spin, but again, don’t know the process for Ubuntu.

    #103737

    localmicro
    Participant

    Thank you so much for this hopeful answer! I have been lost in the wilderness for weeks.
    Okay, so if you have created VRUI et al binary packages for Fedora and I can make a Fedora bootable USB stick,
    then we’re half-way there, right? Half full not half empty, right?
    How hard could it be? What a service to portable humanity!

    #103738

    Oliver Kreylos
    Moderator

    I don’t think it would be hard; mostly tedious to dig through documentation etc. On the Vrui download page you’ll find some (outdated) binary Vrui packages, and, more importantly, a spec file to generate binary rpm packages from source tarballs. That, and the Fedora package creation guide, are all you need to create Vrui packages. The spec file is easily adapted to create rpms for the Kinect and SARndbox packages as well.

    How to assemble those packages, and the base system, into a USB image is covered by guides and manual pages covering Fedora spin creation, and that gets you almost there.

    The last bit, and that might be the trickiest part, is making a live USB image with a writable disk partition on it so that you can store calibration data directly on the USB stick, to run an AR Sandbox completely from the stick without even needing an internal hard drive. I dug up some documentation on that years ago, but it seemed complicated.

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