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  • in reply to: Version of Kinect #101682
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    From the instructions page:

    The AR Sandbox software, or rather the underlying Kinect 3D Video Package as of version 2.8, supports all three models of the first-generation Kinect (Kinect-for-Xbox 1414 and 1473 and Kinect for Windows). All three are functionally identical, so get the cheapest model you can find. Note: The second-generation Kinect (Kinect for Xbox One or Kinect for Windows v2) is not yet supported by the AR Sandbox software.

    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    Yes, those components will work, but consider that you’re going to be paying almost USD 3,000 more, compared to a Core i7/GeForce combination, for no significant performance improvement.

    in reply to: Rain setup (options) #101676
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    Works in all of them.

    in reply to: Rain setup (options) #101669
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster
    1. Press and hold “1” and select “Manage Water Locally” tool.
    2. Let go of “1” to assign “rain” function.
    3. Press and relase “2” to assign “dry” function.

    Then, press “1” to rain, or “2” to dry locally.

    in reply to: Complete Installation Instructions #101667
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    I just built the whole thing using both g++ 4.7.2 and g++ 4.9.2, and both worked without flaw.

    Did you by any chance accidentally build against Vrui-3.1-003? Run $ ~/Vrui-3.1/bin/AlignTrackingMarkers -vruiVerbose to see the exact Vrui version you installed.

    in reply to: Complete Installation Instructions #101665
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    What operating system and version of g++ ($g++ -dumpversion) is this?

    in reply to: Cleaning the sand? #101655
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    If you have dust, you should definitely try washing your sand. Sand dust might muck up the workings of your PC and projector, and if your sand is silica/quartz, i.e., the kind of stuff you find at the beach, then you don’t want to breathe in large amounts, either.

    Sandtastik sand, the brand we recommend, has a cleaning guide that might or might not work for you.

    An alternative idea, off the top of my head, would be to dump a bunch of sand into a bucket, fill the bucket with water, and then use a plastic mesh kitchen strainer to fish handfuls of sand back out of the bucket, shaking on the way out to get rid of fine dust. If your sand is finer than the finest strainer you can find, you could try using a cheese cloth, but I’m just spitballing at this point.

    in reply to: Full Screen Mode #101645
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    As of Vrui-3.1-004, all Vrui applications enter/leave full-screen mode via Win+f. Window system-wide keyboard shortcuts still work as well, of course.

    in reply to: Full Screen Mode #101642
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    Creating a text file via terminal:

    $ pluma <name of file>

    pluma is Mate’s text editor, and <name of file> is the file name, with optional path. E.g.,

    $ pluma Vrui.cfg

    to create Vrui.cfg in the current directory, or

    $ pluma ~/Vrui-3.1/etc/FullScreen.cfg

    to create FullScreen.cfg inside Vrui’s default configuration directory.

    If you quickly want to create a short file with only a few lines, you can use cat:

    $ cat > <name of file>

    The first “>” tells cat to write into the given file. Then just type one or more lines into the terminal, and press Ctrl+d to finish the file.

    To display the contents of a (short) text file, use cat without the “>”, e.g.,

    $ cat ~/Vrui-3.1/etc/FullScreen.cfg

    To browse through longer files inside a terminal, use less instead of cat. Of course, you can always use pluma to look at files, but you run the danger of accidentally modifying the file.

    in reply to: Full Screen Mode #101630
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    Add -vruiVerbose to SARNdbox’s command line. This will tell you which configuration files Vrui is trying to load on start-up. Make sure the one you made is among them.

    Don’t worry about icons, but ensure that the name of the file is exactly the same as the one you specify after -mergeConfig. Do an $ ls on the directory where you saved the file, and check that everything matches. If there are spaces or other special characters in the file name, you need to enclose it in double quotes when giving it on the command line.

    in reply to: Model Export #101629
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    That shouldn’t happen, and I don’t know what could be causing it. Try capturing a longer video sequence, and experiment with different frame indices, and see if it makes a difference. Use a frame index range, say 60 100, to check if you get at least a few frames, and look at my comment above regarding the output file name format (it needs to include a number conversion).

    in reply to: Model Export #101628
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    Right you are, the correct invocation is:

    $ ./bin/LWOWriter <depth/color file name prefix> <output file name> <first frame> <last frame>

    <output file name> has to include a printf-style number template to generate one file name per frame, as in OutputFile%06d.lwo, otherwise subsequent frames will overwrite previous ones.

    LWOWriter has to iterate through all frames as depth files are compressed, and have to be processed sequentially. But just skipping a frame is much faster than generating an LWO file.

    Yes, the quality is what you should expect. That’s raw Kinect v1 data for you. This is the reason why the sandbox uses a long baseline low-pass filter to smooth raw data, which causes the 30 frame (1s) delay in topography updates.

    I’m going to add model output as a feature to the next SARndbox version.

    in reply to: dismantling projector #101627
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    Rif6 Cube light output: 50 lumens
    BenQ MX631ST light output: 3200 lumens

    in reply to: USB Button Help #101626
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    Depends on the type of button. Some are set up to emulate keyboards, in which case you should see characters pop up when you press the button while you have a terminal or text editor open.

    Other buttons advertise themselves as HID controllers (which is actually the better way), in which case you’ll have to tell the sandbox software about them explicitly.

    Do an

    $ ls /dev/input

    before and after you plug in your button, and see if a new event device node appeared. If so, you have the second type of button. You can listen to incoming events via

    $ sudo cat /dev/input/event<X>

    where event<X> is the new event node. When you press the button, you will see some garbage-looking output, which are actually HID event reports in binary.

    in reply to: Complete Installation Instructions #101604
    Oliver Kreylos
    Keymaster

    Yes. The file name needs to be BoxLayout.txt , or you can name the file arbitrarily and place it into an arbitrary location, and pass its full path and name to SARndbox via the -slf <sandbox layout file name> command line parameter.

Viewing 15 posts - 316 through 330 (of 494 total)